The Ford Torino Page Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Model Specific Forum > 1972-1976 Ford and Mercury
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - INFO: Adjustable strut rod - the holy grail
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

INFO: Adjustable strut rod - the holy grail

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1234 5>
Author
Message
Eliteman76 View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 20-March-2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 4492
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eliteman76 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-January-2015 at 6:28PM
A couple interesting reads.

Vendor for kits, but not our cars. Decent reference pictures however.

Regardless, Poly Bushings are still sounding like a no-fly zone.
Andrew
Back to Top
Billy C View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 10-February-2010
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Status: Offline
Points: 905
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Billy C Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19-January-2015 at 6:59PM
It was already a large A-arm because of the solidly bolted connection to the lower arm. 

   Part of me is worried about the limit on all the factory parts since I don't know it. Even chopping the OEM rotors off the hubs I was amazed at how easily the cast iron cut. It made me start to worry about them too. I ran a quick analysis on the hubs assuming it was a basic cast iron alloy. With 100% load transfer in the front and 1g of cornering acceleration on a 27" tall tire they should be close to failure. Shocked Not knowing the actual material is a big issue in figuring out how strong things are.

   When I cut the threads in the radius rods the material felt good. It felt like a high quality steel. Not as gummy as a 41xx series but I'm sure it was at least a basic structural alloy similar to something like A36. I feel confident in the rods. The factory thread is a 5/8 course thread. The minor diameter on that thread would be the failure point of the rod when in tension. We are re-cutting a 3/4" fine thread which barely removes any material compared to the factory thread. 

   New tire compounds change everything. The way I toss my 4000lbs around, I'm just waiting for the next component to break even if it's just a completely unaltered OEM part. I'm only getting stickier with the tires so we will see.

-Billy Conturo
Back to Top
Eliteman76 View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 20-March-2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 4492
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eliteman76 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-January-2015 at 7:59AM
Billy, I'm going to simply sleeve mine with Dom thick wall tubing, fish mouth the ends for good weld coverage and move on. How much do you want to machine up a set of strut rods for me?
Andrew
Back to Top
Big Bird View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 25-August-2013
Location: New York
Status: Offline
Points: 3237
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Big Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20-January-2015 at 10:07AM
Seems to me a Heim joint at the front might be an improvement over a marshmallow bushing???
The above post should be read in a "Grumpy Old Man" voice.
Almost forgot: "Get off my lawn!!!"
Randy
1979 T-Bird
2006 GMC Sierra
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-September-2015 at 4:46AM

Really interested in getting this sorted.

 
I did find this in Australia.  Got a quote and spoke to them about modifying it for a Torino.
 
 
Seems that the spherical bearing approach would be easier to maintain.
-John


Edited by BackInBlack - 02-September-2015 at 4:55AM
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
robot9000 View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 02-September-2011
Location: Michigan
Status: Offline
Points: 500
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote robot9000 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-September-2015 at 8:22AM
Sort of off topic, when I replaced all my front bushings with urethane, I also replaced the strut rod bushings.  What I did not do was torque them down all the way. I noticed that at the same torque spec, the urethane hardly moved, so yeah, there is pressure on the rod.  Back off the bolt and it still keeps everything tight, but allows the rod to move. Acts much more like the rubber.  I am sure there is a durometer/squish/torque relationship here, but I am but a humble IT guy, not a Materials  Engineer.
1973 Gran Torino Sport
2010 Mazda 6
2007 Jeep Wrangler
2011 Damon Daybreak 35BD
Back to Top
Big Bird View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 25-August-2013
Location: New York
Status: Offline
Points: 3237
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Big Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-September-2015 at 1:27PM
Another take on this idea:
it's for a G.M., but these cars also used the narrow LCA with a radius rod.
Also available for Mustangs:
 
 


Edited by Big Bird - 02-September-2015 at 1:30PM
The above post should be read in a "Grumpy Old Man" voice.
Almost forgot: "Get off my lawn!!!"
Randy
1979 T-Bird
2006 GMC Sierra
Back to Top
72FordGTS View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06-September-2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 2248
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 72FordGTS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02-September-2015 at 2:17PM
Originally posted by robot9000 robot9000 wrote:

Sort of off topic, when I replaced all my front bushings with urethane, I also replaced the strut rod bushings.  What I did not do was torque them down all the way. I noticed that at the same torque spec, the urethane hardly moved, so yeah, there is pressure on the rod.  Back off the bolt and it still keeps everything tight, but allows the rod to move. Acts much more like the rubber.  I am sure there is a durometer/squish/torque relationship here, but I am but a humble IT guy, not a Materials  Engineer.
 
I think the general consensus was with stock strut rods your best to stick with rubber bushings.  There have been some reported incidents of stock strut rods breaking with urethane bushings since they were designed to work with flexible rubber bushings. 


Edited by 72FordGTS - 02-September-2015 at 2:17PM
Vince

1972 Ford GTS Sportsroof - Survivor, One Family car
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 6:44AM
Has anyone looked at modifying/adapt a 71 Torino strut rod to replace the 72-73 strut rod??
 
 
1.  Looks like the length is a little different which can be compensated with a longer threaded sleeve.
2.  The bushing mount uses the same size bolt, if the hole in the frame is slightly different size then a bushing can be replaced to fit.
3.  The biggest difference is the Lower control arm mount.  The foot is a different angle.  This appears to be the most difficult to modify to adapt this option.  Weld more material and redrill?


Edited by BackInBlack - 03-September-2015 at 6:45AM
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 6:52AM
I've had some email correspondence with Leslie/Eric and littleshopmfg.com
 
They are willing to fab an adjustable strut arm if we can get 8 peeps together to order.  Anyone interested?   I'm ready.
 
I'd be happy to produce this part if you could get at least 8 people committed to purchasing it. Lots of people asking/wanting it but no one has set up something to make it happen. If you want to organize that, I'd be fine with the manufacturing side of it. 
Rough figure would be $250-350 for a pair. 

-John


Edited by BackInBlack - 03-September-2015 at 6:53AM
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
madmaxtorino View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar
Zombie Killing Training Instructor

Joined: 04-August-2010
Location: Dunn Tn
Status: Offline
Points: 940
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote madmaxtorino Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 7:32AM
Im in for some. Shop is about two miles from my house, so I could help with getting him strut rods or even a car for mock up. Allan
Allan
Revelation 6:8
When there is no more room in Hell, the dead will walk the Earth.
Back to Top
Big Bird View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 25-August-2013
Location: New York
Status: Offline
Points: 3237
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Big Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 9:34AM
So, they are making something like this:
 
The above post should be read in a "Grumpy Old Man" voice.
Almost forgot: "Get off my lawn!!!"
Randy
1979 T-Bird
2006 GMC Sierra
Back to Top
Rockatansky View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 30-July-2010
Location: On The Road
Status: Offline
Points: 3823
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rockatansky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 11:17AM
8 doesn't sound that hard to do, maybe get another forum in on it to help?
72 GT Ute
   
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 1:44PM
Originally posted by Big Bird Big Bird wrote:

So, they are making something like this:
 

Ahhhh nope...that is a complete replacement suspension.  Different subject.   

Its a stock replacement adjustable strut arm to fix the problem of the bushing binding and A-arm getting knocked out of alignment thus adding to more bumpsteer and other screwy effects.

Just like the ones for the Mustangs and the CPP arm for 71 torino.    No one else interested in the group buy other than Alan and myself?

No word from Andy?   would he be interested?

-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
72FordGTS View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06-September-2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 2248
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 72FordGTS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 2:36PM
I'd actually be interested just not now.  All my cash is going into my motor and trans next.  Once that's done, I'd commit with a deposit if necessary.  Even though I want my car to appear basically stock, I think this would be a subtle and worthwhile upgrade to ensure that the suspension geometry stays put.
Vince

1972 Ford GTS Sportsroof - Survivor, One Family car
Back to Top
Billy C View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 10-February-2010
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Status: Offline
Points: 905
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Billy C Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03-September-2015 at 5:56PM
There are a few different designs floating around now. I'd be interested to see what design is chosen for a small run. Any ideas?
I count 3 bolt on options.

Originally posted by Global West Global West wrote:

 

Originally posted by RRS RRS wrote:

 

Originally posted by cggrob cggrob wrote:


I personally like how easy the RRS is.

I was kinda playing with a similar design for our stock rods. Like this.. 

Obviously with a spacer between the bearing and the seat that the washer usually sits. I left out all the hardware and stuff too. The caster is adjusted by swapping spacers. This could be very cost effective and a totally bolt-on affair. I just don't like axial load on sphiricals but using a safe number of 15% radial load limit for the axial load limit, a bearing to fit this application wouldn't be anything exotic. The rod is weak in comparison. The only reason I didn't do this is because I don't think the rod is strong enough for what I am doing around that 5/8 thread and of course the axial loading issues.

I could make a ton of something like this for cheap.
-Billy Conturo
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 3:25AM
That is basically that RRS solution.  Worth a try.
 
I think the heim bearing option looks good especially if they fabricate a better strut rod to go with it.  Its proven, easy to maintain, easy to get parts to replace the rod end if needed.
 
I'm thinking that you don't see that much axial load on that strut arm.  Its the suspension compression and forces from a bump from something like a pothole that would shock the arm.  If you can figure out the loading with the suspension compressed and the shock load from the lower control arm pulling on the rod while the suspension is compressed that may be the max load you'll see. 
 
 I have no way to know for sure.  Your guess is better than mine. 
 
 
So far we only have 2-3 people interested in a group buy for an adjustable strut-arm.  Is there anyone else to contact that would be interested?   We need 8 people to sign up. 


Edited by BackInBlack - 09-September-2015 at 7:24AM
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
Billy C View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 10-February-2010
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Status: Offline
Points: 905
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Billy C Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 3:50AM
Axial load is the load that wants to pull the ball out of the socket. Its the only kind of load in the design above and I do believe it's significant.
-Billy Conturo
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 4:04AM
Translation...
You believe the rubber bushings absorb much of the shock if the wheel gets hit hard.  When you go to the hard mount strut rod your concerned that the rod itself may be a failure item because its not designed to take that shock at the threaded end near the bushing?
 
I guess its worth looking at the mustang rods from the likes of Total Control Products, CPP, etc. and find out what material they used (prolly chromoly tubing) and the size of the rod to get an idea of the shock load they designed it for...just a thought for a reference.
 
 
 


Edited by BackInBlack - 04-September-2015 at 4:06AM
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
72FordGTS View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06-September-2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 2248
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 72FordGTS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 4:28AM
Originally posted by BackInBlack BackInBlack wrote:

Translation...
You believe the rubber bushings absorb much of the shock if the wheel gets hit hard.  When you go to the hard mount strut rod your concerned that the rod itself may be a failure item because its not designed to take that shock at the threaded end near the bushing?
  
 
Yes, this is why I believe some have seen strut rod failure with urethane bushings.  When Ford engineered this suspension, they wanted the lower control arm to move fore and aft with road impacts.  The rubber cushioning of the strut rod allow for this.  Remember most suspensions from this era were primarily designed for smooth ride first. 
 
That said, a properly engineered rod will ensure the lower control arm will always be in the correct position and ensure that suspension geometry is maintained under all conditions, at perhaps a slight increase in ride harshness.  I think looking at the Mustang rods is a good start.  I wonder though if the Torino's have more load on their arms due to the great weight and the spring being on the LCA? 


Edited by 72FordGTS - 04-September-2015 at 4:30AM
Vince

1972 Ford GTS Sportsroof - Survivor, One Family car
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 4:59AM
I think the shock/load from an impact would be the same regardless of the vehicle weight.  for simplicity, assume the vehicle mass absorbs a negligible amount relative to the wheel shock of an impact from a pot hole (for example).   Just thinking about simple vectors of the car forward motion vs the mass of the wheel/suspension.
 
I think the poly bushing failure mode is more complex.  I'm thinking its also the repeated up/down motion of the wheel levering on the bushing which is more rigid due to the "hardness" of the poly bushing.  All the pics from the Mustangs and other cars with this suspension show the breakage occurs right at the threads near the nut.  Its as if the arm is prying up/down near the nut until the metal fatigues (over time and usage) until it fractures.
 
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
mlachance112785 View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 31-May-2012
Location: Dighton, MA
Status: Offline
Points: 340
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mlachance112785 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 8:06AM
Any idea on price?
77 Cougar XR7 460/C6
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 8:19AM
Originally posted by mlachance112785 mlachance112785 wrote:

Any idea on price?
 
From previous post on this thread:
I've had some email correspondence with Leslie/Eric and littleshopmfg.com
 They are willing to fab an adjustable strut arm if we can get 8 peeps together to order.  Anyone interested?   I'm ready.
 
I'd be happy to produce this part if you could get at least 8 people committed to purchasing it. Lots of people asking/wanting it but no one has set up something to make it happen. If you want to organize that, I'd be fine with the manufacturing side of it. 
Rough figure would be $250-350 for a pair. 
 
So far we have 2 people.  Maybe 3.
-John
 
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
JimW View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 09-December-2003
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 602
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JimW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 8:57AM
I am interested!  Perfect time to do the A Arms and new springs..
  
1976 S&H Gran Torino

460/C6/4.33 13.05@105.6

545/C6/3.56 11.52@117.8

More to come!!!!

463rwhp/495rwtq

two tons of fun

see it and hear it at:

www.torinocobra.com

www.st
Back to Top
Rockatansky View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 30-July-2010
Location: On The Road
Status: Offline
Points: 3823
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rockatansky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 11:10AM
I'm 5/8 in
72 GT Ute
   
Back to Top
lynchster View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 07-January-2006
Location: Pennsylvania
Status: Online
Points: 1665
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lynchster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 11:23AM
Are these to be completely new strut rods or modified factory ones?
Chuck
72 Gran Torino Sport
91 F-150
Back to Top
BackInBlack View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11-January-2011
Location: Virginia
Status: Online
Points: 793
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BackInBlack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 12:26PM
My understanding is they are new strut rods.  I've asked the question and awaiting the response.  It would be a bad idea for a company to produce anything but a new rod just for liability reasons unless they dont require any mods to the OEM rods.

So far looks like 4 solid people.  I'll start a list now.
John 
Allan
Andy
JimW 




Edited by BackInBlack - 04-September-2015 at 12:29PM
-John
1973 GTS
Back to Top
72FordGTS View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06-September-2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 2248
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 72FordGTS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 1:39PM
Originally posted by BackInBlack BackInBlack wrote:

I think the shock/load from an impact would be the same regardless of the vehicle weight.  for simplicity, assume the vehicle mass absorbs a negligible amount relative to the wheel shock of an impact from a pot hole (for example).   Just thinking about simple vectors of the car forward motion vs the mass of the wheel/suspension.
 
I think the poly bushing failure mode is more complex.  I'm thinking its also the repeated up/down motion of the wheel levering on the bushing which is more rigid due to the "hardness" of the poly bushing.  All the pics from the Mustangs and other cars with this suspension show the breakage occurs right at the threads near the nut.  Its as if the arm is prying up/down near the nut until the metal fatigues (over time and usage) until it fractures.
 


I still figure that a 4000 lb car will hit a pot hole with more force than a 3000 lb car, and this force will be carried through the front suspension...

You're right about the poly bushing failure though, the up and down motion would likely have more on a fatiguing factor on the strut rods than the fore and aft.  But bottom line is that the factory rods were never intended to be used with an inflexible joint that the poly bushings create.

I hope you guys are able to get enough interest in these rods....I just wish I had the cash to commit now.
Vince

1972 Ford GTS Sportsroof - Survivor, One Family car
Back to Top
Big Bird View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 25-August-2013
Location: New York
Status: Offline
Points: 3237
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Big Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 2:27PM
Originally posted by BackInBlack BackInBlack wrote:

I think the shock/load from an impact would be the same regardless of the vehicle weight.  for simplicity, assume the vehicle mass absorbs a negligible amount relative to the wheel shock of an impact from a pot hole (for example).   Just thinking about simple vectors of the car forward motion vs the mass of the wheel/suspension.
 
I think the poly bushing failure mode is more complex.  I'm thinking its also the repeated up/down motion of the wheel levering on the bushing which is more rigid due to the "hardness" of the poly bushing.  All the pics from the Mustangs and other cars with this suspension show the breakage occurs right at the threads near the nut.  Its as if the arm is prying up/down near the nut until the metal fatigues (over time and usage) until it fractures.
 
It's a bit of both, the impact shock and the flex at the same moment. It's not just the up-and-down as the strut rod also keeps the LCA from moving front-to-back as it goes up-and-down. Stiffening the bushing means the rod flexes at the bushing, instead of the bushing flexing, and the threaded area is where it focuses the stress.
The picture I posted above of the nascar suspension still uses bushings, but the rods are heavier, and they used BIG sleeves for adjustment.
If I was going to use a stiffer bushing,  I wouldn't want the strut rod necked down where the threads are.
I would like to see how the Global West design works in the real world, the RRS design seems like it would be good as well. I just wonder where these designs will move the "Fail-point" to.


Edited by Big Bird - 04-September-2015 at 2:31PM
The above post should be read in a "Grumpy Old Man" voice.
Almost forgot: "Get off my lawn!!!"
Randy
1979 T-Bird
2006 GMC Sierra
Back to Top
russosborne View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 01-January-2015
Location: Glendale AZ
Status: Offline
Points: 533
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote russosborne Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-September-2015 at 4:30PM
Did I miss what design would be what this company is going to do if there is enough interest?
Thanks,
Russ
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1234 5>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.