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Which Respirator for Painting a Car?

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dave302 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 04-August-2014 at 2:26PM
I have a friend who is going to be painting his car soon. He had asked me and many other people about which type of respirator to use, while he is painting the car.
He has chosen to use either a solvent based acrylic (non-urethane) enamel automobile paint, or a solvent based acrylic (urethane) enamel automobile paint. We have heard that the acrylic (urethane) enamel would be better to use, than the acrylic (non-urethane) enamel.
 
But we have also heard that if he chooses to paint with the acrylic (urethane) enamel instead of the acrylic (non-urethane) enamel, he will need to use more full body/full face protection (like gloves, coveralls and a fresh-air-feed full face respirator) while the (urethane) paint is being sprayed. Is this part true?
 
This paint that he is going to be using is just an acrylic urethane enamel, it is not a solvent based acrylic (100% urethane/non-enamel) auto paint, like some other auto paints are. He is going to be painting with the sherwin williams 3RD dimension brand.
 
The paint he will be spraying is a two part paint. It will be mixed with a hardener (the hardener most likely contains Isocyanates) and there is also a reducer needed to spray with this paint. he is not going to be spraying with a metallic, metal flake, pearl or candy color paint.
 
I do not know if all of this full body/full face protection is needed, to spray a urethane enamel automobile paint. Is it really needed?
 
The most important questions in this thread are: what type of a respirator should he use? and is there any special type of specification numbers for the filters that he should look for when buying the respirator? the person that is going to paint this vehicle will have plenty of fresh air where he is going to be painting.
 
We have done many long searches on this subject, but we could not find any answers. There are two pictures below, of a respirator that my friend has found for sale. He is only going to paint one vehicle. do you think that this respirator is good enough?
 
The advertisement for this respirator says:
This is a quality industrial chemical respirator for automotive and industrial painting and organic vapors of low toxicity. Great for filtering small dusts, mists, metallic fumes, spray paint, chemicals.
Features:
Brand new and high quality double cartridges respirator mask
Designed to protect you from breathing in dust and fine powders
Dual gas cartridges for spray painting and organic vapours of low toxicity
Dual cartridge system can be replaced with different cartridges for acidic gases or other chemical vapors
The soft nose and mouth cover will fit all users
Dual strap system adjusts easily for comfort
Glasses size (L X W): Approx.7.4 x 3.14inch / 19 x 8cm
Mask size (L X W): Approx.7.0 x 4.7inch / 18x 12cm
Material PVC + Active Carbon + PC

Package Includes:
1 x Respirator Mask
1 x Glasses
 
Thank you for any answers that you can give to us.
 
 
 
 


Edited by dave302 - 04-August-2014 at 3:04PM
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Big Bird View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Big Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-August-2014 at 3:05PM
At a minimum, you want a HEPA/Organic vapor cartridge on the respirator. A pre-filter over the cartridge is a good idea, to keep droplets of paint out of the filters. That cloth around the edges on the one in the picture is a problem. You need to get a good seal.
If you are using an isocyanate based hardener, a supplied air full-face respirator would be ideal, but you need a compressor or a cascade system to supply air. The full-faces are awkward if you aren't used to them and restrict your vision, but they are positive pressure and also keep crap out of your eyes.
That being said, in a well-ventilated area, I have used half-face respirators with hepa/organic filters for isocyanate based hardeners, and when I was young (and indestructible) I sprayed a lot of lacquers without any respirator (VERY BAD IDEA).
The above post should be read in a "Grumpy Old Man" voice.
Almost forgot: "Get off my lawn!!!"
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dave302 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dave302 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-August-2014 at 3:34PM
Thank you for the answers, we appreciate it.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote californiajohnny Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-August-2014 at 4:16PM
^^^ what randy said! i was just looking on ebay last night for new straps for two of my survivair respirators (the elastic bands are worn out) no luck on the bands, i'll have to order them through my paint supply store, but anyway, there were lots of new complete respirators both the sas survivair and north brands for sale (im currently using a north, that's missing one pre filter cover, i was trying to find one of those as well) complete ones were running from $20- $40 and up, so don't go cheap, but don't get ripped off either! also when you are not using it keep it in a large ziplock freezer bag sealed, because those charcoal filters filter the air (all the time) no sense purifying the whole neighborhood, and have the filter used up next time you need it!  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dave302 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-August-2014 at 4:22PM
Thank You for the answers, we appreciate it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Big Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-August-2014 at 4:47PM
3M and Willson make good respirators, and consider getting a couple sets of filters if you are going to be awhile between priming and painting. They will absorb organic vapors from the air, and from any overspray trapped in/on them in a bag. Bottom line, filters are cheap and new lungs aren't.
The above post should be read in a "Grumpy Old Man" voice.
Almost forgot: "Get off my lawn!!!"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote californiajohnny Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04-August-2014 at 4:50PM
JOHN
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Montego01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-August-2014 at 2:22AM
I normally just use the 3M 7192 respirators. These work great. 20 years painting and I still have a half of a lung left.
...just kidding.  I'm fine.

For small motorcycle jobs I use the 7192 (about $23)
For bigger motorcycle jobs I use the full face mask (uses same cartridges and pre-filters as above)- about $125-$150
For cars I wear my 3M Versaflo - about $1300

Fresh air system is always best, but I just use the above.

I also always wear a spray sock (hood) when painting.

So, for your friend, here would be my suggestions
-3M disposable respirator. They have different sizes. I use 7192 which is medium. When I rent my booth out, most guys where this. This is assuming the overspray will not be stagnant. Hopefully he's spraying in a spray booth.

-Full paint suit. Make sure it's not baggy in the middle as this can drag across the paint when leaning over. If it's baggy, run some tape around where it's baggy
-Nitrile gloves
-I also wear a seat band on my left wrist where the suit and the gloves meet. I've had sweat come out between them and land on the paint...not good.
-Spray sock (they are cloth and about $1.50 each). The paint suit may have a hood which would be fine.
-Some old shoes

He should wear his mask when mixing the clear/hardener



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dave302 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05-August-2014 at 2:46AM
Thank You for the answers, we appreciate it.
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