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FMX vs. C4 Transmission Cooler Lines

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Greg73Oregon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greg73Oregon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: FMX vs. C4 Transmission Cooler Lines
    Posted: 07-June-2022 at 10:49AM
1973 Torino with 351W. Anyone know if the cooler lines are the same?
I'll be pulling out the FMX and installing a C4.
GKF
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handsofstone View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote handsofstone Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07-June-2022 at 4:35PM
Diameter is the same. You may need to bend them a little, I cannot remember. Cutting and using compression couplings to make changes will not affect anything.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rockatansky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-June-2022 at 7:31AM
not the same. usable, maybe? if they're not rusted past the point of being able to be reshaped

compression fittings generally not sound engineering for automotive applications due to vibration. yes i've used them but checked them regularly. needing to check a repair regularly is not a good repair IMO, more like an emergency / temporary deal. using them in inaccessible / underbody locations adds negative points

MBA (My Best Advice) plan on fab'ing new lines from either copper or NiCopp with formed double flares and new tube nuts. 1 piece no connections from 1 end to the other. if you have to, rubber hose & clamps is better then compression fittings, braided hose & double clamps adds points

and FYI you don't want the tubing shaking around rattling unsupported able to contact anything or it'll wear and rub through.

losing a trans cooler line makes for the start of a bad day

don't F around with things you don't want to F around with Wink


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handsofstone View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote handsofstone Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-June-2022 at 7:51AM
 Compression fittings have been used at shops forever. Rubber hose and clamps should be in every tool box for emergencies along with an imp cutter. You can always use flare couplings but it is overkill. We are not talking about high pressure. Transmission cooling lines were installed before the eng/trans at the factory and with all the bends and angles I doubt they can be installed in one piece. Maybe in an old pickup you could. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Big Bird Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-June-2022 at 8:31AM
Hose clamps and rubber line is NOT better than compression fittings. Obviously, Flared fittings are better still, and one piece lines rule the roost, but clamps and hoses are for getting a car home after a problem, not a permanent repair.
Of course, this is all for sound steel lines, if you have "rust belt" steel lines...
"What we do in full frontal view, is more honest than your cleaned-up mind."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rockatansky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-June-2022 at 9:22AM
OEM's and particularly Ford has used rubber hose & clamps rather than compression fittings on both the trans cooler lines and fuel at the carb
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72 RS 351 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 72 RS 351 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11-June-2022 at 12:49PM
Ditto, I avoid compression fittings for any high pressure fluids, such as fuel, brakes, or transmissions.

I mentioned it in another thread about finding new lines. Most parts stores carry, or used to carry, various lengths of fuel line. I have made trans line from those, both an entire set for a car, and one or two as replacements for old lines. Those may not come in a length to reach from the trans all the way to the top of the radiator line fitting. But it's not hard to buy a union fitting, which connects two lines together. Those fuel lines have flare fittings, which are very secure, though will leak without an o-ring installed in each fitting(easy to do).
Don
73 Ranchero Sport "72 front end", floor shift/console, planning EFI 7000rpm 351-4V &4R70W
73 Ranchero GT 351C-4V 3.70 gears for sale later.
92 Lincoln Mark VII SE, OBDII 347/4R70W
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eliteman76 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-June-2022 at 12:17PM
After my experience recently with Inline Tube, I'd just get them to bend up new lines.

I have salvaged cooler lines before but it takes work.
At this point You can get new line and fab something, or order pre-bent lines and call it a day.
Andrew: Long time Torino guy and GTS.ORG admin
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Greg73Oregon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-June-2022 at 3:11PM
Purchased the "Inline Tube" model.  Look fine.
Thanks.
GKF
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote handsofstone Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22-June-2022 at 6:31PM
Transmission lines are not high pressure. Aftermarket coolers use rubber hoses and clamps. The cooler is simply for cooling. Period. If it were high pressure, your radiator would be failing quite often. Always carry a piece of fuel line, an imp cutter, and clamps for an emergency repair that will last longer than we will be above ground.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 72 RS 351 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23-June-2022 at 1:41AM
With respect, ATF cooler lines are not high pressure, true, but they are not really low pressure either. They have enough pressure in them to blow the rubber hoses off if the clamp is not properly tight. The problem is that rubber hoses shrink and swell with age, so the line and cooler has to have a barbed end or a large bulge. The clamp has to be tighter(smaller) than the bulge or the barbs, but still over time the hose will leak at the clamp. So that's not a lifetime parts combination, it needs attention on rare occasions. I prefer to eliminate the rubber hoses if possible, at least reduce the number of hose clamp connections.

Look into Pushlok hose connections, those are made to be permanent using proper rubber hoses made for them. Those have very sharp and deep barbs, which do bite into the hose permanently. The proper hose made for those doesn't even need to have a hose clamp, to remove the hose requires cutting it off of the barbs, carefully to not damage the barbs.
Don
73 Ranchero Sport "72 front end", floor shift/console, planning EFI 7000rpm 351-4V &4R70W
73 Ranchero GT 351C-4V 3.70 gears for sale later.
92 Lincoln Mark VII SE, OBDII 347/4R70W
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